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How to play the Gm6 chord on guitar

Learn to play the dreamy Gm6 chord, featured in hits like "Wonderwall" and "Hey There Delilah."

The Gm6 chord

The Gm6 chord, pronounced "G minor sixth," is a rich and expressive chord that adds a touch of melancholy to any musical composition. It's formed by combining the notes G, B♭, D, and E, creating a complex harmony often used in jazz, R&B, and neo-soul genres. Notable songs featuring the Gm6 chord include "I Will Survive" by Gloria Gaynor and "Ordinary People" by John Legend.

There are many ways to play a chord. Here's a diagram for the most common Gm6 chord. We've also included other versions below.

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Finger placement for Gm6 chord

The most popular way to play the Gm6 chord on guitar is as a barre chord on the 3rd fret.

Follow these finger positions to play a Gm6 chord on your guitar:

  1. Place your index finger across all six strings on the 3rd fret, forming a barre.
  2. Place your middle finger on the 4th fret of the 3rd (G) string.
  3. Place your ring finger on the 5th fret of the 5th (A) string.
  4. Place your pinky finger on the 5th fret of the 4th (D) string.

To strum this chord, place your fingers in the correct positions and strum all six strings together in a downward motion.

How to play an easy Gm6 chord on guitar

If you're a beginner looking to play a simpler version of the Gm6 chord, try playing it as an open chord instead. Place your index finger on the 1st fret of the A string, your middle finger on the 2nd fret of the D string, and your ring finger on the 3rd fret of the high E string.

How to play a Gm6 bar chord

While the Gm6 chord can be played in an open position, playing it as a barre chord allows you to easily transition to other chords and play the chord in different positions on the fretboard.

Here's how to play a Gm6 barre chord:

  1. Place your index finger across the 3rd fret, covering all six strings.
  2. Place your ring finger on the 5th fret of the 5th (A) string.
  3. Place your pinky finger on the 5th fret of the 4th (D) string.
  4. Place your middle finger on the 4th fret of the 3rd (G) string.
  5. Strum all six strings from the low E string.

Common Gm6 chord progressions

The Gm6 chord is often used in progressions that evoke a sense of melancholy, nostalgia, or emotional depth. Here are some common chord progressions featuring Gm6:

  • i6 - iv - V7 (Gm6 - Cm - D7): Used in "Autumn Leaves" and "Cry Me a River"
  • i6 - ii7b5 - V7 (Gm6 - Am7b5 - D7): Used in "Black Orpheus"
  • i6 - V7/iv - iv - V7 (Gm6 - A7/D - Cm - D7): Used in "The Girl from Ipanema"
  • i6 - iv - VII7 - III7 (Gm6 - Cm - F7 - Bb7): Used in "Satin Doll"
  • i6 - vi - ii - V7 (Gm6 - Eb - Am - D7): Used in "Misty"

Drills to master the Gm6 chord

To master the Gm6 chord, try playing the notes (G, Bb, D, E) in different orders as arpeggios. Start slow and gradually increase your speed. This will help your fingers get comfortable with the shape and transitions.

Another effective drill is to practice switching between Gm6 and other common chords like Cm or D7. Focus on making the transitions smooth and clean. Regularly incorporating Gm6 into chord progressions will make it feel more natural over time.

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Songs that feature the Gm6 chord

Here are 10 popular songs you can play with the Gm6 chord.

  1. Creep by Radiohead (G, B, C, Cm)
  2. All of Me by John Legend (Ab, Fm, Db, Eb)
  3. Rocket Man by Elton John (Gm, C, F, Dm)
  4. Skinny Love by Bon Iver (Am, C, Dm, Gm)
  5. Seven Nation Army by The White Stripes (Em)
  6. Mad World by Gary Jules (Em, G, D, A, Am)
  7. Stay With Me by Sam Smith (Am, F, C, G)
  8. Hallelujah by Leonard Cohen (C, Am, F, G, Em)
  9. Royals by Lorde (D, C, G)
  10. Ain't No Sunshine by Bill Withers (Am, Em, G, Dm)

How a guitar teacher can help

If you feel stuck in your playing, it might help to take personalized guitar lessons with an expert guitarist. Taking lessons with a pro gives you access to the skills, feedback, and motivation to reach your goals.

You can find expert guitar teachers to support you in the journey. Thousands of people have turned to online guitar lessons on Til, instead of traditional in-person lessons, because Til gives you access to the best teachers in the world from the comfort of home. And with flexible scheduling, secure payments, lesson recordings, and a private chat with your teacher–there’s never been a better way to learn guitar.

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