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How to play the A minor over G# chord on guitar

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The Am/G# chord

The Am/G# chord, pronounced "A minor over G sharp," is a unique and intriguing variation of the standard A minor chord. By incorporating a G# note in the bass, this chord adds a subtle yet captivating tension to the harmonic structure. While not as commonly used as its traditional counterpart, the Am/G# chord can be found in various genres, adding depth and complexity to musical compositions.

There are many ways to play a chord. Here's a diagram for the most common A minor over G# chord. We've also included other versions below.

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Finger placement for Am/G# chord

The most common way to play the A minor over G# chord on guitar is as a barre chord on the 4th fret.

Follow these finger positions to play an A minor over G# chord on your guitar:

  1. Barre your index finger across all six strings on the 4th fret.
  2. Place your ring finger on the 6th fret of the 4th (D) string.
  3. Place your pinky finger on the 6th fret of the 3rd (G) string.

To strum this chord, use a downward stroke to play all six strings simultaneously. Alternatively, you can pluck the notes individually for a more delicate sound.

How to play an easy Am/G# chord on guitar

If you're a beginner looking to play a simpler version of the A minor over G# chord, try playing an Am chord shape starting on the 4th fret. Place your index finger on the 4th fret of the B string, middle finger on the 5th fret of the D string, and ring finger on the 5th fret of the G string.

How to play a Am/G# bar chord

Playing the A minor over G# chord as a barre chord can make it easier to transition to and from other chords, and can also provide a fuller sound.

Here's how to play an A minor over G# barre chord:

  1. Place your index finger across all six strings at the 4th fret, creating the barre.
  2. Place your middle finger on the 5th fret of the 2nd (B) string.
  3. Place your ring finger on the 6th fret of the 4th (D) string.
  4. Place your pinky finger on the 6th fret of the 3rd (G) string.
  5. Strum from the 5th (A) string down.

Common Am/G# chord progressions

The A minor over G# chord (Am/G#) is a striking and emotive chord that often appears in chord progressions to add a sense of tension, longing, or bittersweetness. Here are some common chord progressions featuring Am/G#:

  • i - IV - V - iv (Am - D - E - Dm) - Used in "Creep" by Radiohead
  • VI - iv - i - V (F - Dm - Am - E) - Used in "Wonderwall" by Oasis and "Don't Look Back in Anger" by Oasis
  • i - VII - VI - VII (Am - G - F - G)
  • i - VI - III - VII (Am - F - C - G)
  • i - iv - VII - VI (Am - Dm - G - F)

Drills to master the Am/G# chord

To master the A minor over G# guitar chord, try this simple drill: play each note of the chord individually, starting with the G# and ascending to the A, C, and E. Once you've played each note, strum the full chord. Repeat this process, gradually increasing your speed until you can seamlessly transition between the individual notes and the complete chord.

Another effective drill is to practice alternating between the A minor over G# chord and other chords commonly used in the same key, such as D major or E major. This will help you develop muscle memory and facilitate smooth chord changes.

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Songs that feature the Am/G# chord

Here are 10 popular songs you can play with the A minor over G# chord:

  1. Creep by Radiohead (G, B, C, Cm)
  2. The A Team by Ed Sheeran (A, D, E)
  3. Tears in Heaven by Eric Clapton (A, E, D, C#m, G#)
  4. Wonderwall by Oasis (Em, G, D, A7sus4)
  5. Mad World by Gary Jules (Am, C, G, D)
  6. Stairway to Heaven by Led Zeppelin (Am, C, D, F, G)
  7. Dust in the Wind by Kansas (Am, C, D)
  8. Hallelujah by Leonard Cohen (C, Am, C/G, F, G, C/E, F)
  9. Yesterday by The Beatles (F, Em, A7, Dm, Bb, C7)
  10. Nothing Else Matters by Metallica (Em, D, C, G, B)

How a guitar teacher can help

If you feel stuck in your playing, it might help to take personalized guitar lessons with an expert guitarist. Taking lessons with a pro gives you access to the skills, feedback, and motivation to reach your goals.

You can find expert guitar teachers to support you in the journey. Thousands of people have turned to online guitar lessons on Til, instead of traditional in-person lessons, because Til gives you access to the best teachers in the world from the comfort of home. And with flexible scheduling, secure payments, lesson recordings, and a private chat with your teacher–there’s never been a better way to learn guitar.

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